Archives for June 2018

Blackburn Joins Bredesen, Corker in Asking Trump to ‘Reconsider’ Tariffs

Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn says President Donald Trump’s administration should reconsider broad tariffs to avoid unintended negative consequences on Tennessee’s economy and workers, her toughest stance on tariffs yet.

The Senate candidate’s letter Wednesday to Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says Tennesseans stand to suffer disproportionate and negative consequences under broad tariffs. Those include tariffs on some foreign steel and aluminum under Trump.

Her likely Democratic opponent, ex-Gov. Phil Bredesen, and Tennessee’s Republican senators, Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander, have offered steady opposition to the tariffs.

Blackburn’s letter says a targeted, limited approach may more effectively address trade issues and mitigate unintended consequences on Tennessee industries, including automotive, agriculture and distilled spirits. Republican Reps. Phil Roe, Scott DesJarlais and Chuck Fleischmann co-signed the letter.

Johnson City Lands $400K Grant to Improve Sewer, Water

Johnson City is soon to get $400,000 to invest in its water and sewer infrastructure.

The grant from the Appalachian Regional Commission supplements local sources which are putting more than a million towards the project.

US Rep Phil Roe told NewsChannel 11 yesterday that the grant “will aid in the continued revitalization of the downtown district, leverage $2.3 million in private investment and promote long-term economic growth.”

Ex-President of Local PTO Pleads Guilty to Theft

A former president of Ridgeview Elementary School’s Parent Teacher Organization has plead guilty to theft.

Both the Tennessee Comptroller’s Office and the Washington County Sheriff’s Office claimed Anissa Moats stole more than $9600 from the PTO between January 2015 and July 2017.

This week, a judge granted Moats judicial diversion, meaning if she complies with her probation for two years, her record will be expunged.

Mosheim Set to Create Police Force

The town of Mosheim is looking to establish their own police department.

At a meeting Thursday night, city leaders voted unanimously in favor of the measure to create their own police force.

Mayor Tommy Gregg told NewsChannel 11 that the city has already purchased the future police headquarters- an old funeral home building on Main Street.

He said the police department will be created with funds from the general fund budget and will likely start with a chief and one patrolman.

He estimates the total cost to start up the police force will be around $200,000.

Mountain Valley Pipeline Construction Halted (Again)

Construction of the Mountain Valley Pipeline in Virginia has been halted to address some soil erosion problems.

Officials said Friday that the suspension is expected to be temporary for the natural gas pipeline’s installation. Construction will resume with approval from Virginia’s Department of Environmental Quality.
DEQ officials said in a statement that the pipeline will direct crews to enhance and restore erosion and sediment controls along the route.

Pipeline officials said in a statement that recent heavy rainfall affected crews’ abilities to control erosion. Pipeline officials said they take their “environmental stewardship responsibilities very seriously.”

The approximately $3.5 billion, 300-mile pipeline will run through West Virginia and Virginia. It’s scheduled to be in service by the end of the year. A number of legal challenges against it are pending.

Lee County Officials Searching For Missing Man

The sheriff’s office in Lee County is asking for the public’s help in finding a missing man.

27-year old Joshua Allen Mooneyhan was last seen early Thursday near Pikeville, Kentucky. Family members told police that he has a sleeping disorder.

He’s a white male, 5’6, with brown hair, blue eyes and a tribal tattoo on his right forearm and the name ‘Abigail’ on the left arm. Anyone with information on Mooneyhan’s whereabouts is asked to call police.

MVP Stops Again

(RICHMOND) — Construction of the Mountain Valley Pipeline in Virginia is halted to address some soil erosion problems…Jim O’Reilly has more…

The suspension is expected to be temporary for the natural gas pipeline’s installation. Construction will resume with approval from Virginia’s Department of Environmental Quality. Recent heavy rainfall affected crews’ abilities to control erosion. The $3.5 billion, 300-mile pipeline will run through West Virginia and Virginia.

Pipeline Build Halted

(RICHMOND) — Construction of the Mountain Valley Pipeline in Virginia is halted to address some soil erosion problems.

The suspension is expected to be temporary for the natural gas pipeline’s installation. Construction will resume with approval from Virginia’s Department of Environmental Quality.

Recent heavy rainfall affected crews’ abilities to control erosion. The $3.5 billion, 300-mile pipeline will run through West Virginia and Virginia.

Manafort Trial Update

(ALEXANDRIA) — A judge in Virginia has asked to hear arguments on whether jurors at Paul Manafort’s trial should hear about his connections to President, Trump…Jim O’Reilly…

Manafort, who served for several months as Trump’s campaign chairman in 2016, is scheduled to go on trial next month in federal court in Alexandria. Manafort is charged in Virginia with hiding tens of millions of dollars from the IRS that he earned advising pro-Russia politicians in Ukraine. Manafort’s lawyers argue that because his alleged misconduct happened in the years before he worked with Trump, jurors should not hear evidence about Manafort’s campaign ties to the President.

Fmr Trump Aid Case Continues

(ALEXANDRIA) — A judge in Virginia has asked to hear arguments on whether jurors at Paul Manafort’s trial should hear about his connections to President, Trump.

Manafort, who served for several months as Trump’s campaign chairman in 2016, is scheduled to go on trial next month in federal court in Alexandria.
Manafort is charged in Virginia with hiding tens of millions of dollars from the IRS that he earned advising pro-Russia politicians in Ukraine.

Manafort’s lawyers argue that because his alleged misconduct occurred predominantly in the years before he worked with Trump, jurors should not hear evidence about Manafort’s campaign ties to the President.